TC-327 Setup Instructions Print E-mail

Compact Grid offers many advantages over competitive belts

Tortilla coolers typically use the Simple Conveyor Layout (Fig 1). Although a tortilla cooler is a multi-tiered conveyor, each tier is considered a straight conveyor with an infeed and a discharge. Each tier also contains a series of drive sprockets and support blanks (Fig 2).

 



Compact Grid offers many advantages over competitive belts

Compact Grid offers many advantages over competitive belts

Compact Grid offers many advantages over competitive belts

Compact Grid offers many advantages over competitive belts

Compact Grid offers many advantages over competitive belts

Compact Grid offers many advantages over competitive belts

On the drive shaft, TC-327 uses one drive sprocket in each of the small spaces across the entire width of the belt. On the idler shaft, TC-327 uses a total of two drive sprockets, which are each positioned on the second small space inward from the belt edges. The remaining small spaces on the idler shaft are fitted with support blanks (Fig 3). By positioning the drive sprockets on the second space inward on the idler shaft, you reduce unnecessary stress on the outside edge enhancing tracking, and extending belt life.


Sprockets and blanks should always be evenly spaced between the z-bends. The correct clearance must be present between every sprocket and its adjacent z-bends. With TC-327 belting it is important to align the sprockets and blanks so that they are precisely centered in the small spaces. This will help them track properly through the pre-shaped wire form of the splicing strand
(Fig 4) once the belt is joined to complete the conveyor circuit. Belt life may be dramatically reduced if the z-bends come in contact with any drive component on the conveyor.


Best Practice: Wire Belt recommends that only genuine Wire Belt TC-327 sprockets and blanks be used with TC-327 belts. Alternative sprockets can cause the belt to surge, jump teeth, and may cause premature failure.*

 

TC-327 is a low-tension belt but every conveyor will require some means to provide tension correction. The simplest method of take-up is a catenary, where the weight of the belt in the return path provides tension on the drive sprockets.


When a catenary take-up is not practical (for example, due to size constraints), other choices are available. Some systems use manual, spring, or screw take-ups that can provide easy adjustment in short conveyors (Fig 5 & 6).


New belts may experience some elongation or minor stretching during their initial use. This is due to “seating” of the wires. Any increase in belt length must be “absorbed” into the catenary loop of the belt return path so that the sprocket teeth remain properly engaged. If too much stretch develops the drive teeth may begin to slip, so the elongation must be removed by some other means. If a mechanical adjustment method is not part of the conveyor design, the user’s maintenance personnel must remove a section of belt and resplice. This is typically a one time exercise, because once the belt is broken-in or “seated” it should run without any further adjustment. When designing your conveyor system, be sure to provide a simple take-up to accommodate this minor belt stretch.

*Required to meet conditions of Guarantee. Call for details.